#parlourinstaguest

During the end of October 2017, I hosted the Parlour Architecture Instagram account with my friends and uni buds Diana Panagakis and Dora Lin. Parlour is a forum for celebrating women, equity and architecture in Australia backed by vibrant discussion and research. For more information about this great association, see their full website at www.archiparlour.org.

Here’s an archive of my posts: check out the full gamut of inspirational posters over on @_parlour!

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In telling my story at the few functions I've been to so far, I often do get the reaction: You must be crazy to do Architecture if you have this illness! Well, I may be designer-y crazy, but I don't believe Architecture isn't for people who have something else that needs managing. As creatives, we've got that intensive passionate streak that can be all-consuming if we let it. I'm certainly still guilty of that! Architecture is a passion, but we need not sacrifice ourselves for it. This is likely no news for you; but I hope that by sharing my story, I can find a niche where working at a manageable pace and creating amazing architecture is possible. Perhaps my most favorite way of keeping my pace relaxed at the moment is conceptual model making! words+pic: @leoniecsanki #spooniestudent #architecture

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Some of our recent readings in our studies with Karen Burns has got me thinking about what kind of role I want to have as an architect. I'm still putting these ideas together, so feel free to share your thoughts too! I think that the Architect has a responsibility to not just design and specify buildings that are safe and ‘sexy’, but also nurture and care for the community. There is something we can do about connecting people in our built environment. Just as doctors look after our health, economists our resources; architects can nurture people's interactions and psyche on somewhat metaphysical level – perhaps this will mean an architect's education would include branches of psychology and sociology instead of structural systems? The more we learn, the more specialised our professions become – perhaps it is the engineer who becomes solely concerned with a building’s systems and the architect is more engaged with buildings' empathetic integrity. words+pic: @leoniecsanki #happy #architecture #thinkingoutloud

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